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I love stuff like this because of the metaphors it supplies.

I’m not a fighter. I haven’t been in anything close to a fight in 15 years. I’m resistant to the idea of fighting, and fear fantasies where I would need this (knock on wood) though being prepared… blah blah blah. But I like how these principles can be applied to non-violent creative activism.

  1. Get Loud – This is the element of surprise. It makes you seem more powerful than you actually are, stuns your subject, and puts them off guard. In terms of non-violent creative activism, how can you use the element of surprise? How can you metaphorically (or literally) get loud?
  2. Move Quickly – if you remain stationary, you’re an easier target. Our subjects are smart, and can adapt to our tactics if they stay the same. As creative activists, how can we remain in motion with our ideas and actions?
  3. Shifting Focus – redirect attention, or changing the frame. Don’t try to beat your opponent at their game, or work with what suits them best. When your opponent is focused on one area, you strike at another causing a mental shift. These are valuable concepts. How can your creative action change the frame, shift focus, or engage in a way your subject is not prepared for?

Towards the end, the hosts asks about fear and Redenbach’s answer has a wonderful moment. If, when something goes wrong, you “erroneously interpret it as ‘this is proof that I can’t deal with it’ you actually go into a negative spiral.” And what prevents that? Education and preparation.

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